Federal - H Con Res 27

Fiscal 2016 House Budget Resolution

Introduced

March 20, 2015

Description

An original concurrent resolution establishing the budget for the United States government for fiscal year 2016 and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2017 through 2025.

Our Position

Oppose

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 0

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • May 1, 2015Cleaver, D-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.176, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E651

  • April 29, 2015House Vote 176 Fiscal 2016 Military Construction-VA and Energy-Water Appropriations — Rule
    Adoption of the rule (H Res 223) that would provide for House floor consideration of the fiscal 2016 military construction and veterans affairs bill (HR 2029) and for consideration of the fiscal 2016 energy and water development bill (HR 2028). The rule also would "deem" as effective for House budget enforcement purposes the discretionary spending allocations in the fiscal 2016 budget resolution (H Con Res 27) that was adopted by the House in March. Adopted 240-186.

  • April 21, 2015Ruiz, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.142, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E546

  • April 21, 2015Ruiz, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.141, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E546

  • April 21, 2015Ruiz, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E546

  • April 21, 2015Ruiz, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E546

  • April 21, 2015Ruiz, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.138, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E546

  • April 21, 2015Ruiz, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.137, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E546

  • April 21, 2015Ruiz, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.136, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E546

  • April 20, 2015 — Conference committee proceeding held by House and Senate conferees.

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.142, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.141, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.138, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.136, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.133, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.132, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.137, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E464

  • April 13, 2015 — Placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. S2108

  • April 13, 2015 — Received in the Senate and held at the desk. Congressional Record p. S2108

  • March 26, 2015O'Rourke, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E445

  • March 26, 2015O'Rourke, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.142, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E445

  • March 26, 2015O'Rourke, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.141, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E445

  • March 26, 2015O'Rourke, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E445

  • March 26, 2015O'Rourke, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.138, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E445

  • March 26, 2015O'Rourke, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.137, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E445

  • March 26, 2015O'Rourke, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.136, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E445

  • March 26, 2015DeFazio, D-Ore., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E437

  • March 25, 2015House Vote 142 Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Adoption
    Adoption of the concurrent resolution that would provide for $2.937 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2016, not including off-budget accounts. It would assume $5.5 trillion in spending reductions over the next 10 years, including by assuming repeal of the 2010 health care law. It also would propose reducing spending on Medicare and Medicaid and changing programs such as food stamps. It would call for restructuring Medicare into a "premium support" system beginning in 2024, call for a deficit-neutral overhaul of the tax code that lowers rates and assume $147 billion in additional savings through "dynamic scoring," and would include instructions to committees to trigger the budget reconciliation process to cut mandatory spending. The resolution would call for fiscal 2016 base discretionary spending that adheres to the sequester-reduced defense and non-defense caps set by the Budget Control Act, and for future years it would assume a 10-year increase in defense caps of $387 billion while calling for cutting non-defense caps by $759 billion. As amended, for fiscal 2016 it would call for allowing $96 billion in uncapped war-related funding to provide additional defense funding beyond sequester-reduced caps, without requiring offsets. Adopted 228-199. Congressional Record p. H2021

  • March 25, 2015 — Committee of the Whole amendment agreed to by voice vote. Congressional Record p. H2020

  • March 25, 2015House Vote 141 Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Republican Non-Offset Substitute
    Price, R-Ga., substitute amendment that would provide for $2.937 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2016, not including off-budget accounts. It would assume repeal of the 2010 health care law; and propose reducing spending on Medicare and Medicaid and changing programs such as food stamps. It would call for restructuring Medicare into a "premium support" system beginning in 2024, call for a deficit-neutral overhaul of the tax code that lowers rates and assume savings through "dynamic scoring," and recommends instructions to committees to trigger the budget reconciliation process to cut mandatory spending. The resolution would call for fiscal 2016 base discretionary spending that adheres to the sequester-reduced defense and non-defense caps set by the Budget Control Act, and for future years it would assume a 10-year increase in defense caps of $387 billion while calling for cutting non-defense caps by $759 billion. For fiscal 2016 it would propose adding $38 billion more than the president requested for the Overseas Contingency Operations account, and would not call for an offset. Adopted in Committee of the Whole 219-208. Congressional Record p. H1998-H2017, H2018-H2019

  • March 25, 2015House Vote 140 Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — House Budget Committee Substitute
    Price, R-Ga., substitute amendment that would provide for $2.935 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2016, not including off-budget accounts. It would assume $5.5 trillion in reduced spending over the next 10 years - including by assuming repeal of the 2010 health care law and proposing reduced spending on Medicare and Medicaid and changing programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. It would assume future savings by calling for restructuring Medicare into a "premium support" system beginning in 2024. It also would call for a deficit-neutral overhaul of the tax code that would lower rates and it would assume $147 billion in additional savings through "dynamic scoring," and would include instructions to committees to trigger the budget reconciliation process to cut mandatory spending. The resolution would call for fiscal 2016 discretionary spending that adheres to the sequester-reduced defense and non-defense caps set by the Budget Control Act, but for future years it would assume a 10-year increase in defense caps of $387 billion while calling for cutting non-defense caps by $759 billion. For fiscal 2016, it would propose adding $36 billion more than the president requested for the uncapped Overseas Contingency Operations war funding account, but would call for $20.5 billion of that amount to be offset by other spending cuts. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 105-319. Congressional Record p. H1983-H1998, H2017-H2018

  • March 25, 2015House Vote 139 Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Democratic Substitute
    Van Hollen, D-Md., substitute amendment that would provide for $3.211 trillion in new budget authority for fiscal 2016, not including off-budget accounts. The proposal would call for bringing non-defense discretionary spending up to pre-sequester levels for 2016 and adding the same amount of additional defense funding, providing funding for the president's early childhood initiative to provide access to preschool, fully funding the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, and it would assume funding of the president's proposed six-year $478 billion surface transportation reauthorization. It would propose a deficit-neutral reserve fund to implement a tax overhaul that would include provisions like expanding the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit. It also would propose extending so-called "tax extenders" as long as they are offset. The Democratic budget would assume an increase in the federal minimum wage, enactment of a comprehensive immigration overhaul and overhaul of the unemployment compensation program. The proposal would assume full implementation of the 2010 health care overhaul and would accommodate deficit-neutral legislation to permanently address the Medicare reimbursement rate issue known as the "doc fix." On taxes, the plan would accommodate an expansion of tax incentives that encourage low-income and middle-income taxpayers to attend college and save for retirement. It would call on Congress to raise revenue by closing loopholes and ending tax breaks for special interests and the very wealthy. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 160-264. Congressional Record p. H1963-H1980, H1982-H1983

  • March 25, 2015House Vote 138 Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Republican Study Committee Substitute
    Stutzman, R-Ind., substitute amendment that would provide for $ 2.804 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2016, not including off-budget accounts. The substitute would call for reducing spending by $7.1 trillion over 10 years compared to the Congressional Budget Office baseline. The proposal would call for capping discretionary spending at $975 billion in fiscal 2016, freezing it for two years, and then allowing it to grow with inflation. It would call for setting discretionary defense spending at $570 billion, non-defense discretionary spending at $405 billion and allowing for $58 billion in Overseas Contingency Operations. The measure would call for, after fiscal 2019, OCO spending being incorporated into (non-emergency) discretionary defense spending. The proposal would call for repeal of the 2010 health care overhaul, converting Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program into block grant programs and transitioning Medicare to a premium-support system. It would propose changing the inflationary index for Social Security benefits to "chained" CPI for all government programs and gradually increases eligibility to age 70 for Social Security. It also would propose converting the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program into a block grant program and changing it to a discretionary program. The amendment would outline guidance for a tax overhaul, including stating that taxes should be revenue neutral based on dynamic scoring and that the alternative minimum tax be repealed. It also would propose that federal funding for transportation be limited to core federal duties, such as the interstate highway system. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 132-294. Congressional Record p. H1946-H1963, H1981-H1982

  • March 25, 2015House Vote 137 Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Congressional Black Caucus Substitute
    Butterfield, D-N.C., substitute amendment that would provide for $3.491 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2016, not including off-budget accounts. The substitute would call for an additional $500 billion over the first three years for infrastructure and jobs programs. It also would call for approximately $300 billion over ten years to increase funding for anti-poverty programs, such as the Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program, and would recommend raising the federal minimum wage. The proposal would assume repeal of the sequester. It would recommend policy changes intended to generate additional revenue, including adding a public option to the health insurance exchanges created by the 2010 health care overhaul, passing a comprehensive immigration overhaul and ending spending from the Defense Department's Overseas Contingency Operations account. The substitute would propose calculating Social Security cost-of-living adjustments using the Consumer Price Index for the Elderly. The plan would outline a number of revenue-raising options totaling $5.6 trillion, including limiting the corporate debt interest deduction to 25% from the current 35%, and making it an after-tax credit. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 120-306. Congressional Record p. H1938-H1946, H1981

  • March 25, 2015House Vote 136 Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Congressional Progressive Caucus Substitute
    Ellison, D-Minn., substitute amendment that would provide for $3.7 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2016, not including off-budget accounts. The plan would assume repeal of the sequester. It would call for increasing near-term borrowing in order to restore full employment, raising overall spending by $1.3 trillion over 10 years and increasing revenues by $6.9 trillion over that period through a variety of policies that would increase taxes for corporations and high-income individuals. It would call for increasing spending on a variety of workforce initiatives, social programs and other activities, including K-12 schools and teacher support and public works jobs programs to aid distressed communities. It would recommend restoring federal unemployment benefits to a 99-week maximum through 2017 and would call for $135 billion to be used to permanently address the Medicare reimbursement rate issue known as the "doc fix." The substitute would call for increasing the progressivity of the individual income tax code by adding five higher marginal tax rates, eliminating tax deferrals owed on U.S.-foreign controlled companies and imposing a financial transactions tax. It would recommend creation of a public insurance option to be sold within the health insurance exchanges and propose allowing Medicare to negotiate rates for prescription drugs and services. It also would call for cuts to non-emergency Defense Department spending and elimination of funding for Overseas Contingency Operations after fiscal 2016. In addition, the substitute would call for implementation of a comprehensive immigration overhaul, including a pathway to citizenship, transparency in national security budgets and the public financing of campaigns. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 96-330. Congressional Record p. H1930-H1938, H1980

  • March 25, 2015 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H1909-H2021

  • March 24, 2015 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H1870-H1895

  • March 24, 2015House Vote 133 Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Rule
    Adoption of the rule (H Res 163) that would provide for House floor consideration of the fiscal 2016 budget resolution (H Con Res 27). Adopted 237-180. Congressional Record p. H1868-H1869

  • March 24, 2015House Vote 132 Fiscal 2016 House Budget Resolution — Previous Question
    Woodall, R-Ga., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 163) that would provide for House floor consideration of the fiscal 2016 budget resolution. Motion agreed to 238-180. Congressional Record p. H1868

  • March 23, 2015 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 163, reported to the House as a rule for H Con Res 27.

  • March 23, 2015 — House Rules Committee granted a structured rule providing for consideration of the concurrent resolution. Congressional Record p. H1842

  • March 23, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Rules Committee.

  • March 20, 2015

  • March 20, 2015 — Reported to the House by the House Budget Committee and placed on the Union Calendar. H Rept 114-47Congressional Record p. H1847

  • March 20, 2015 — Introduced as an original bill in the House. Congressional Record p. H1842, H1847

  • March 19, 2015Draft bill text released by Rep. T. Price, R-Ga.

  • March 19, 2015 — Budget Committee vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution-Vote to Report
    Ordered reported favorably to the full House (as amended) 22-13.

  • March 19, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Budget Committee.

    March 19, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Overseas Contingency Operations funding
      Rokita, R-Ind. —

    Amendment would increase Overseas Contingency Operations budget authority to $96 billion. It would also eliminate a reserve fund with about $20 billion for defense, sending that money to the war spending account without the need for an offset.

    Withdrawn.

    March 19, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Technical Changes
    Rokita, R-Ind. —

    Amendment would make technical changes to the budget resolution.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    March 19, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Budget Aggregates
    Rokita, R-Ind. —

    Amendment would adopt budget aggregates, functional categories and other appropriate matters as amended.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    March 19, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Vote to Report

    Bulk up defense spending over the next decade and set in motion plans to balance the budget in eight years with $5.47 trillion in spending cuts, mostly to entitlement programs.

    The GOP blueprint would stick to statutory spending caps for fiscal 2016 discretionary programs, totaling $1.017 trillion for the upcoming year, but would provide an extra $39 billion for war spending above the request, for a total of $90 billion for the Pentagon.

    But over the next nine years, the budget would cut non-defense discretionary spending by more than $700 billion below current projections. Continuing a practice used in past House budget resolutions, the plan proposes increasing defense spending above the statutory caps and reducing non-defense spending below the caps and estimated expenditures between fiscal 2017 and 2025.

    The blueprint would eliminate the deficit by 2024 by proposing to broadly redraw entitlement programs such as Medicare and turning them more fully over to states. The budget would repeal the 2010 health care law and turn Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps, and related programs into a block grant. All of those entitlement changes would require separate legislation to be implemented.

    The resolution also includes reconciliation instructions, which are written to require deficit reduction in both chambers. The 2010 health care overhaul is the primary target, but the House blueprint would also allow reconciliation to be used for Medicare, a tax overhaul and changes to food stamps, among other instructions.

    Ordered reported favorably to the full House (as amended) 22-13.
  • March 18, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Budget Committee.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Middle- and Lower-Class Pay
      Van Hollen, D-Md. —

    Amendment that would create a deficit-neutral reserve fund aimed at providing tax breaks and incentives to the middle and lower class in order to boost pay.

    It would provide incentives for corporations to raise employee pay and invest in training programs. It would also express the sense of the House that Congress should clear the CEO-Employee Paycheck Fairness Act (HR 620), which would incentivize companies to give workers annual raises that keep pace with increases in the cost of living and labor productivity. If a company does not do so, the bill would bar them from claiming tax deductions for CEO bonuses exceeding $1 million.

    Rejected 13-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Middle Class Taxes
      Pocan, D-Wis. —

    Amendment would express the sense of the House rejecting any effort to raise taxes on the middle class.

    Rejected 14-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Sequester Replacement
      Norcross, D-N.J. —

    Amendment would end discretionary spending caps for fiscal 2016 as mandated under the 2011 Budget Control Act. The amendment would offset the increased defense and non-defense spending by closing corporate tax breaks related to so-called inversions.

    Rejected 14-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — VA Funding Boost
      Moulton, D-Mass. —

    Amendment would boost funding for the Department of Veterans Affairs to match the president’s request for fiscal 2016 and 2017 and make all funding for the department advance appropriations. The provision would have offset its costs by reducing or eliminating certain tax breaks and loopholes.

    Rejected 14-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Medicare Protection
      M. Lujan Grisham, D-N.M. —

    Amendment that would express the sense of the House that Medicare is a "highly successful program" and that it should not be subject to any changes in law that would hurt beneficiaries or weaken the program.

    Rejected 11-20.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Medicaid Spending
      Dingell, D-Mich. —

    Amendment would reverse the cuts to Medicaid that the GOP budget resolution would make between fiscal 2016 and 2025. The spending would be offset by reducing tax benefits and closing loopholes for the top 1 percent of income earners and certain corporations.

    Rejected 12-20.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Health Care Tax Credits
      Pascrell, D-N.J. —

    Amendment that would increase mandatory budget authority and outlays to ensure health care premium tax credits under the health care law for fiscal 2016 through 2025.

    The provision would offset its costs by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    It would amend the committee report to include language that assumes continuation of premium tax credits provided by the Affordable Care Act.

    Rejected 13-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
      Moore, D-Wis. —

    Amendment that would increase budget authority and outlays to reverse cuts in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. It would offset its costs by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    Rejected 13-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — National Poverty Strategy
    B. Lee, D-Calif. —

    Amendment that would express the sense of the House that it supports developing a national strategy to eradicate poverty, with the initial goal of cutting poverty in half in 10 years.

    The strategy would include a multi-pronged approach that would ensure a livable wage, provide education and job training, provide support for struggling families, remove barriers and obstacles to economic and educational opportunities, and provide support for the most vulnerable including seniors, the severely disabled and children.

    Rejected 12-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution — National Investment in Biomedical Research
    Castor, D-Fla. —

    Amendment that would increase mandatory budget authority and outlays to promote scientific jobs and expand and sustain biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health. The provision would offset its cost by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    Rejected 12-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Primary Care in Medicare and Medicaid
    McDermott, D-Wash. —

    Amendment that would increase budget authority and outlays to ensure that individuals relying on Medicaid and Medicare have access to primary care. It would increase budget authority and outlays $5.4 billion annually from fiscal 2016 through fiscal 2025.

    The provision would offset its cost by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    It would amend the committee report with language to protect access to primary care for Medicaid enrollees by providing federal funding for states to restore primary care reimbursement rates for physicians at 100 percent of the Medicare rate.

    Rejected 12-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Comprehensive Immigration Reform
    Yarmuth, D-Ky. —

    Amendment that would assume an increase in aggregate levels of revenue from an immigration overhaul. It would increase border security and immigration budget authority and outlays over the next 10 fiscal years.

    It would express the sense of the House that it is imperative that the full House vote on comprehensive immigration legislation to establish clear and just rules to provide citizenship, secure borders, boost the economy and lower deficits.

    Rejected 13-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Growth in Manufacturing
    T. Ryan, D-Ohio —

    Amendment that would increase mandatory budget authority and outlays to establish a scale-up manufacturing initiative and expand the National Network of Manufacturing Institutes.

    The provision would offset its cost by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    Rejected 14-18.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
    Lieu, D-Calif. —

    Amendment that would express the sense of the House that Congress should continue to support the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as well as its governing and financing structures.

    It would include findings that the bureau is an important component of the country’s response to the financial crisis and recession; is playing a critical role in protecting student loan borrowers, older Americans, services members and other consumers; has independence from efforts to interfere with its missions and activities; and has already faced and overcome efforts to obstruct its operations.

    It would amend the committee report to include language that assumes continuation of the bureau and supports its work.

    Rejected 14-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Medicare Benefits for Seniors
    M. Lujan Grisham, D-N.M. —

    Amendment that would express the sense of the House that the 2010 health care overhaul provides important benefits for seniors and should not be repealed. Benefits include the gradual closing of the prescription drug coverage gap, coverage of key preventive services and annual wellness visits with no co-pays or deductibles, better coordinated care for chronic diseases, expanded support for alternatives to nursing homes, and protections against abuse for nursing home residents.

    It would include findings that the repeal of the overhaul would take away important benefits and increase out-of-pocket costs for seniors by hundreds or thousands of dollars.

    Rejected 14-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Social Security Commission
    Van Hollen, D-Md. —

    Amendment that would express the sense of the House that Congress should clear legislation that uses Social Security’s existing reserves to prevent cuts in Social Security’s earned benefits, and should make no cuts in earned Social Security benefits.

    It would include findings that the projected shortfall in the Social Security Disability Insurance trust fund should be addressed through changes that permit Social Security to use its existing overall resources to fund SSDI benefits.

    Rejected 14-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Transportation and infrastructure Funding
    Castor, D-Fla. —

    Amendment that would increase budget authority and outlays for transportation and infrastructure and prevent cuts assumed in the chairman’s mark.

    The provision would offset its cost by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    It would add language to the committee report that assumes the baseline level of funding for transportation funding, without the cuts in the chairman’s mark.

    Rejected 14-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Earned Income Tax Credit
    Moore, D-Wis. —

    Amendment that would increase Earned Income Tax Credit budget authority and outlays.

    The provision would offset its cost by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    It would add language to the committee print that assumes that EITC expansion for childless workers and for non-custodial parents, and a broadening of benefits, including changes to make benefits available in a broader age range and at somewhat higher incomes.

    Rejected 14-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Student Loans
    Pocan, D-Wis. —

    Amendment that would assume legislation to create a deficit-neutral reserve fund for student loan refiinancing and increase mandatory budget authority and outlays to maintain increases for maximum Pell grant and in-school interest subsidies for needy students.

    The provision would offset its cost by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    It would add language to the committee report to express the intent of Congress to lower student debt with deficit-neutral legislation to allow refinancing of student loans at the lowest available rate, by maintaining in-school interest subsidies on certain loans for needy students and by maintaining mandatory funding for increases in the Pell grant.

    Rejected 14-20.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Minimum Wage
    Yarmuth, D-Ky. —

    Amendment that would express the sense of the House that Congress should act to raise the minimum wage.

    It would include findings that the minimum wage has not been increased since 2009 and that its real value is at historically low levels. It also would include findings that a minimum wage increase would raise the incomes of millions of workers and lift many Americans out of poverty.

    Rejected 14-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Early Childhood Development
    McDermott, D-Wash. —

    Amendment that would increase budget authority and outlays to support a partnership with states to create universal access to preschool education and ensure high quality programs. It also would increase budget authority and outlays to maintain and expand maternal infant and early childhood visiting program and extend the Children’s Healthy Insurance Program

    The provision would offset its cost by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    It would amend the committee report to assume creation of of a federal-state collaboration to help states provide university access to preschool education for all low- and moderate-income four-year-olds. It would also assume expansion of a voluntary home visiting program for at-risk children, as well as a four-year funding extension for CHIP.

    Rejected 14-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Health Care Overhaul Savings
    Pascrell, D-N.J. —

    Amendment that would create a point of order again any measure that would repeal the health care overhaul or provide permanent tax break extensions, if the House has agreed to a budget resolution that assumes revenue increases or Medicare outlay reductions under the health care law, or assumes revenues if all provisions of the Internal Revenue Code expire at the end of fiscal 2025, as scheduled.

    It would amend the committee report with language describing the new point of order.

    Rejected 14-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Overseas Contingency Operations Fund
    Van Hollen, D-Md. —

    Amendment that would limit the use of funding appropriated to the Overseas Contingency Operations title of an appropriations bill for war activities and related diplomatic and development operations, or for activities related to countering urgent national security threats.

    It would provide that OCO funding shall not be used for regular, base budget activities.

    It would amend the committee report to include language that the Budget Control Act of 2011 allows discretionary caps to be automatically increased for OCO funding, which has created a loophole that has been used to circumvent discretionary spending caps.

    Rejected 14-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Overseas Contingency Operations Funding
    B. Lee, D-Calif. —

    Amendment that would decrease Overseas Contingency Operations budget authority by $36 billion in fiscal 2016 and continue decreases each year through fiscal 2025.

    It would add language to the committee report that assumes OCO spending is limited to levels that military commanders and the diplomatic corps say are needed.

    Rejected 14-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Long-Term Care
    Dingell, D-Mich. —

    Amendment that would assume creation of a deficit-neutral reserve fund for long-term care services and supports. It would allow the Budget chairman to revise allocations, aggregates and other appropriate levels for any measure that improves the availability of long-term-care services for senior citizens and the disabled, and does not increase the deficit from fiscal 2016 to fiscal 2020, or from fiscal 2016 to fiscal 2025.

    It would amend the committee report with language to encourage deficit-neutral proposals for a comprehensive long-term-care insurance program, and for studies, pilot programs and changes in Medicaid, Medicare and other programs to help increase access to long-term care.

    Rejected 14-22.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Infrastructure investment
    Norcross, D-N.J. —

    Amendment that would express the sense of the House that Congress should reauthorize surface transportation programs, with a financing mechanism that allows for continued investments in highways and transit systems; modernize the air traffic control system and aviation infrastructure; address needs of the nation’s ports; support passenger and freight rail; support efforts to modernize the electric grid; ensure access to high-speed broadband; and maintain and modernize water and sewer infrastructure.

    It would state that Congress should finance necessary investments through the reduction of some corporate tax breaks for multinational corporations, including provisions that permit companies to invert their corporate structure, move overseas and reduce taxes, and that encourage companies to move jobs and capital offshore and to hold foreign profits abroad.

    Rejected 14-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — Career and Technical Education
    Moulton, D-Mass. —

    Amendment that would support career and vocational education with an increase in mandatory budget authority of $202 million in all years from fiscal 2016 through fiscal 2025 and increase outlays by varying amounts each year through fiscal 2025.

    The provision would offset its cost by reducing tax subsidies for oil companies, certain tax exemptions for international corporations and tax breaks for corporate jets and individuals who are in the top 1 percent of wage earners.

    It would amend the committee report to include language that assumes the increased funding would be provided as part of the career and technical education reauthorization in support of President Obama’s goal of ensuring that every high school graduate is ready for college and that the United States leads the world in college completion by 2020.

    Rejected 14-21.

    March 18, 2015 — Committee Vote: Fiscal 2016 Budget Resolution — National Security Policy
      M. Blackburn, R-Tenn. —

    Amendment that would include defense policy language to make clear that Overseas Contingency Operations funds will be used to support defense at a level that is above President Obama’s fiscal 2016 budget proposal.

    It would also include findings that the president’s fiscal 2016 budget request exceeds spending caps under the Budget Control Act and includes proposed tax increases.

    It would encourage an immediate re-evaluation of priorities to maintain the strength of America’s national security posture and identification of policies to restructure and stabilize the government’s major entitlement programs.

    Adopted 22-14.

Legislative Action Center