Federal - S 1177

No Child Left Behind Act Overhaul

Introduced

April 30, 2015

Description

An original bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to ensure that every child achieves.

Our Position

Support

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 0

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • March 17, 2016 — Written report to accompany the bill reported by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. S Rept 114-231Congressional Record p. S1590

  • Dec. 10, 2015 — Became Public Law, PL 114-95, 129 Stat. 1802. Congressional Record p. D1316

  • Dec. 10, 2015 — Signed by the president. Congressional Record p. H10716

  • Dec. 9, 2015Rubio, R-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.334, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. S8513

  • Dec. 9, 2015 — Enrolled measure signed in the House. Congressional Record p. H9204

  • Dec. 9, 2015 — Enrolled measure signed in the Senate. Congressional Record p. S8542

  • Dec. 9, 2015 — Measure cleared for the president. Congressional Record p. S8513

  • Dec. 9, 2015Senate Vote 334 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Conference Report
    Adoption of the conference report on the bill that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act through fiscal 2020. Total authorizations in the measure would equal $24.5 billion for fiscal 2017 and would increase to $26.1 billion in fiscal 2020. It would eliminate the federal school accountability system created by the No Child Left Behind law and instead require states to establish their own accountability systems, and would maintain the requirement for regular student proficiency testing in math, reading and science. States would need to submit their accountability plans to the Education Department for approval. The department would be barred from requiring particular academic standards. It also would require school districts to develop plans, which states would need to approve and monitor, to address the lowest performing five percent of schools that receive Title I funding and high schools in which less than two-thirds of the student body graduates. It also would require schools in which a subgroup of students consistently underperforms to develop support and improvement plans, which would need to be approved and monitored by school districts. Adopted (thus cleared for the president) 85-12. Note: A "yea" was a vote in support of the president's position. Congressional Record p. S8513

  • Dec. 9, 2015 — Conference report considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S8509-S8513

  • Dec. 8, 2015Webster, R-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.665, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1737

  • Dec. 8, 2015Senate Vote 333 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the conference report on the bill that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act through fiscal 2020, eliminate the federal school accountability system created by the No Child Left Behind law and instead require states to establish their own accountability systems, and maintain the requirement for regular student proficiency testing in math, reading and science. Motion agreed to 84-12. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S8453

  • Dec. 8, 2015 — Conference report considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S8447-S8479

  • Dec. 3, 2015Takai, D-Hawaii, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.654, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1705

  • Dec. 3, 2015Takai, D-Hawaii, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.653, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1705

  • Dec. 3, 2015Garrett, R-N.J., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.665, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1711

  • Dec. 3, 2015 — Received in the Senate and held at the desk.

  • Dec. 3, 2015 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture on the conference report to accompany the bill, offered. Congressional Record p. S8425-S8426

  • Dec. 3, 2015 — Conference report considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S8425-S8426

  • Dec. 2, 2015House Vote 665 K-12 Education Agreement — Passage
    Adoption of a conference report to accompany the Every Student Succeeds Act (S 1177) that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) for four years, through FY 2020. The bill would replace the No Child Left Behind Act, ending the federal accountability system and shifting academic standards and school accountability authority back to states and local school districts. The measure would continue the requirement for regular testing of students to assess their proficiency in math, reading, and science, with the results of those assessments to be disaggregated by race, income, and other categories to determine whether any subgroup of students is lagging academically. States would be required to develop plans to help the lowest-performing 5 percent of all public schools, high schools that fail to graduate one-third or more of their students, and schools where a subgroup of students consistently underperforms. Adopted 359-64. Note: A "yea" was a vote in support of the president's position. Congressional Record p. H8951-H8952

  • Dec. 2, 2015House Vote 654 Education Reauthorization and Energy Standards — Rule
    Adoption of the rule (H Res 542) would provide for House floor consideration of HR 8, the bill that would revise national energy efficiency standards, require the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to designate at least 10 corridors across federal lands in the Eastern U.S. where pipelines could be built, and require the Department of Energy to expedite decisions on applications to export liquefied natural gas , and the conference report to accompany S 1177, the bill that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) through FY 2020, replacing the No Child Left Behind Act and transferring authority for setting academic standards to the states, continuing the requirement to regularly test students in math, reading, and science, and requiring states to develop plans to help underperforming public and high schools. Adopted 240-181. Congressional Record p. H8884

  • Dec. 2, 2015House Vote 653 Education Reauthorization and Energy Standards — Previous Question
    Burgess, R-Texas, motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 542) that would provide for House floor consideration of HR 8, the bill that would revise national energy efficiency standards, require the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to designate at least 10 corridors across federal lands in the Eastern U.S. where pipelines could be built, and require the Department of Energy to expedite decisions on applications to export liquefied natural gas , and the conference report to accompany S 1177, the bill that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) through FY 2020, replacing the No Child Left Behind Act and transferring authority for setting academic standards to the states, continuing the requirement to regularly test students in math, reading, and science, and requiring states to develop plans to help underperforming public and high schools. Motion agreed to 243-177. Congressional Record p. H8883

  • Dec. 2, 2015 — Conference report considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H8844-H8894, H8951-H8952

  • Dec. 1, 2015 — House Rules Committee granted a rule providing for consideration of the conference report to the bill. Congressional Record p. H8839

  • Dec. 1, 2015 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • Nov. 30, 2015 — Conference report filed in the House. H Rept 114-354Congressional Record p. H8644

  • Nov. 18, 2015 — Senate conferees named: Alexander, R-Tenn., Enzi, R-Wyo., Burr, R-N.C., Isakson, R-Ga., Paul, R-Ky., Collins, R-Maine, Murkowski, R-Alaska, Kirk, R-Ill., Scott, R-S.C., Hatch, R-Utah, Roberts, R-Kan., Cassidy, R-La., Murray, D-Wash., Mikulski, D-Md., Sanders, I-Vt., Casey, D-Pa., Franken, D-Minn., Bennet, D-Colo., Whitehouse, D-R.I., Baldwin, D-Wis., Murphy, D-Conn., and Warren, D-Mass.. Congressional Record p. S8034

  • Nov. 18, 2015Senate Vote 308 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the McConnell, R-Ky., motion to disagree with the House amendment and agree to the request from the House for a conference on the bill that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. The motion also would authorize the presiding officer to appoint conferees. Motion agreed to 91-6. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S8029-S8033

  • Nov. 18, 2015 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to disagree to the House amendment to the bill, agree to the request from the House for a conference, and to authorize the presiding officer to appoint conferees, agreed to by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S8029-S8034

  • Nov. 18, 2015 — Conference committee proceeding held by House and Senate conferees.

  • Nov. 17, 2015 — The House named conferees: Kline, R-Minn., Foxx, R-N.C., Roe, R-Tenn., Thompson, R-Pa., Guthrie, R-Ky., Rokita, R-Ind., Messer, R-Ind., Grothman, R-Wis., Russell, R-Okla., Curbelo, R-Fla., Scott, D-Va., Davis, D-Calif., Fudge, D-Ohio, Polis, D-Colo., Wilson, D-Fla., Bonamici, D-Ore., and Clark, D-Mass.

  • Nov. 17, 2015 — Kline, R-Minn., motion to insist on the House amendment to the bill and to go to conference with the Senate, agreed to by voice vote. Congressional Record p. H8271-H8272

  • Nov. 17, 2015 — Other measure, HR 5, passed the House in lieu, pursuant to the provisions of H Res 526. Congressional Record p. H8258-H8259, H8260

  • Nov. 17, 2015 — Amendment in the nature of a substitute, consisting of the text of HR 5, adopted pursuant to the provisions of H Res 526. Congressional Record p. H8258-H8259, H8260

  • Nov. 17, 2015 — Considered by the House, pursuant to the provisions of H Res 526. Congressional Record p. H8258-H8259, H8260

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.242, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.235, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.232, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.247, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.246, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.245, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.244, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.243, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.241, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.240, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.249, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.234, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.233, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.239, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.236, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.238, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.237, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5206

  • July 21, 2015 — Received in the House and held at the desk. Congressional Record p. H5303

  • July 16, 2015Senate Vote 249 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Passage
    Passage of the bill that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. States would be responsible for creating accountability systems and determining the weight of test results in assessing school performance. It also would prohibit the Education Department from mandating certain educational standards, like Common Core. As amended, the bill would change how Title I funds are distributed to states and school districts. Passed 81-17. Congressional Record p. S5150

  • July 16, 2015Senate Vote 248 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. States would be responsible for creating accountability systems and determining the weight of test results in assessing school performance. It would also prohibit the Education Department from mandating certain educational standards, like Common Core. Motion agreed to 79-18. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S5149

  • July 16, 2015Senate Vote 247 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Preschool
    Casey, D-Pa., amendment no. 2242 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would provide funding for states for preschool for low-income children. The amendment would include an offset that would increase taxes on those who earn more than $1 million a year. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 45-52. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5142-S5143

  • July 16, 2015Senate Vote 246 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Full-Service Community Schools
    Brown, D-Ohio, amendment no. 2100 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would authorize grants to assist public elementary or secondary schools to function as full-service community schools. The amendment would define such schools as those that particulate in efforts to coordinate and integrate educational, developmental, family health and other comprehensive services through community-based organizations and public and private partnerships and that provide students, families and the community with access to these services. It also would authorize grants to state collaboratives to support development of such programs. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 53-44. Congressional Record p. S5142

  • July 16, 2015Senate Vote 245 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Title I Formula Change
    Burr, R-N.C., amendment to the Alexander substitute amendment that would change how Title I funds are distributed to states and school districts. It would distribute all Title I funds through one formula, called equity grants, that would be based on the number of poor children in the state and the national average cost of educating a child. As modified, the new formula would not kick in until Title I spending reaches $17 billion. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 59-39. Congressional Record p. S5140-S5141

  • July 16, 2015Senate Vote 244 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — College Readiness Accounts
    Coons, D-Del., amendment no. 2243 to the Alexander substitute amendment that would direct the Education secretary to establish a pilot program and award 10 grants to eligible entities for the creation and administration of American Dream Accounts, personal online accounts for low-income students that monitor higher education readiness and include a college savings account. The American Dream Accounts for students would be used to: open a college savings account; monitor student progress online, including academic data and other student data related to postsecondary readiness and access; and provide opportunities to learn about financial literacy, prepare for enrollment in a higher education institution and to identify skills or interests. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 68-30. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5140

  • July 16, 2015Senate Vote 243 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Low-Income Youth Employment
    Sanders, I-Vt., amendment no. 2177 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would create an Employ Young Americans Fund to which $5.5 billion would be appropriated for fiscal 2016. The amendment would require the Labor Secretary to allot $4 billion to provide employment opportunities to low-income youth and award $1.5 billion in allotments and competitive grants to local entities for work-related and educational strategies and activities of demonstrated effectiveness to unemployed, low-income young adults and youth to provide the skills and aid needed to obtain jobs. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 43-55. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5139-S5140

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, as amended, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5144

  • July 16, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Peters, D-Mich., amendment no. 2095 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to allow local educational agencies to use parent and family engagement funds for financial literacy activities, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5144

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Warren, D-Mass., amendment no. 2249 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend section 1111(c) of the ESEA to require States to provide an assurance regarding cross-tabulation of student data, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5144

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment no. 2240 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to provide resources needed to study and review Native American language medium schools and programs, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5144

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for King, I-Maine, amendment no. 2256 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the definitions of eligible technology and technology readiness survey and to provide a restriction on funds, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5144

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Thune, R-S.D., amendment no. 2232 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to allow extended services Project SERV grants under part A of Title IV of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to be available for violence prevention activities, adopted by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S5144

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Capito, R-W.Va., amendment no. 2156 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the State report card under section 1111 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to include the rates of enrollment in postsecondary education, and remediation rates, for high schools, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5144

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Baldwin, D-Wis., amendment no. 2188 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to ensure States will ensure the unique needs of students at all levels of schooling, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5144

  • July 16, 2015Senate Vote 242 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — State Assessments and Accountability Systems
    Cruz, R-Texas, amendment no. 2180 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would make assessments and accountability systems optional for states. It would prohibit the Education secretary from requiring states, as a condition for approving state plans, to include accountability systems or assessments in state plans, or to use the inclusion of such assessments or systems as a factor in awarding federal funding. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 40-58. Congressional Record p. S5139

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Boozman, R-Ark., amendment no. 2231 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to support professional development to help students prepare for postsecondary education and the workforce, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5143-S5144

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment no. 2222 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the State plan requirements of section 1111 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 in order to support children facing substance abuse in the home, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5143

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Nelson, D-Fla., amendment no. 2215, as modified, to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to include partnering with current and recently retired STEM professionals and tailoring educational resources to engage students and teachers in STEM, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5143

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Murphy, D-Conn., amendment no. 2186 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to establish the Promise Neighborhoods program, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5143

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment no. 2130 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend Title I to support assessments of school facilities, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5143

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Warren, D-Mass., amendment no. 2106 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to include specialized instructional support personnel in the literacy development of children, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5143

  • July 16, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Hatch, R-Utah, amendment no. 2082 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 relating to early learning, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5143

  • July 16, 2015 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S5134-S5150

  • July 15, 2015Blumenthal, D-Conn., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.240, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S5116

  • July 15, 2015Senate Vote 241 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Interventions for Low-Performing Schools
    Murphy, D-Conn., amendment no. 2241 to the Alexander substitute amendment that would require states to identify the five percent of lowest performing schools, high schools with a graduation rate of less than 67 percent for two years in a row, and any school that misses goals for subgroups for two years in a row. Local educational agencies with these identified schools would need to develop and implement intervention and support strategies. Local education agencies would be able to create their own intervention methods but if the local intervention is not working after three years, the state would be required to intervene. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 43-54. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102, S5117

  • July 15, 2015Senate Vote 240 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Indicators of Student Access to Critical Resources
    Kirk, R-Ill., amendment no. 2161 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would require state accountability plans to additionally describe how the state will measure and report on indicators of student access to critical educational resources and identify disparities, including least three out of five indicators specified in the amendment, such as availability of wellness programs and core academic subject courses. It also would require a description of how the state will develop plans with local educational agencies to address disparities, including annual benchmarks. If a local agency does not achieve its benchmarks for two years in a row, the state would have to allocate resources and supports. State report cards also would need to include information on the indicators of student access to critical educational resources. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 46-50. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5116-S5117

  • July 15, 2015Senate Vote 239 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Mental Health Systems and Schools
    Heitkamp, D-N.D., amendment no. 2171 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would authorize grants to state and local educational agencies to increase student access to quality mental health care and support by developing innovative programs to link local school systems with local mental health systems, like those under the Indian Health Service. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 58-39. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5099, S5115-S5116

  • July 15, 2015Senate Vote 238 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Climate Change Education
    Markey, D-Mass., amendment to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would direct the establishment of a competitive grant program to provide grants to states to develop or improve climate science curriculum and supplementary education materials for grades kindergarten through 12, develop or expand statewide plans and programs for climate change education or to create state green school building standards or policies. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 44-53. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102, S5115

  • July 15, 2015Senate Vote 237 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089 that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Motion agreed to 86-12. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S5098

  • July 15, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Warren, D-Mass., amendment no. 2120 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend section 1111(d) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 regarding the cross-tabulation of student data, withdrawn by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5104

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Warren, D-Mass., amendment no. 2249 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend section 1111(c) of the ESEA to require States to provide an assurance regarding cross-tabulation of student data, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5104

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment no. 2240 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to provide resources needed to study and review Native American language medium schools and programs, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5104

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for King, I-Maine, amendment no. 2256 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the definitions of eligible technology and technology readiness survey and to provide a restriction on funds, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5103-S5104

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Thune, R-S.D., amendment no. 2232 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to allow extended services Project SERV grants under part A of Title IV of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to be available for violence prevention activities, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5103

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Capito, R-W.Va., amendment no. 2156 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the State report card under section 1111 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to include the rates of enrollment in postsecondary education, and remediation rates, for high schools, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5103

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Baldwin, D-Wis., amendment no. 2188 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to ensure States will ensure the unique needs of students at all levels of schooling, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5103

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Boozman, R-Ark., amendment no. 2231 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to support professional development to help students prepare for postsecondary education and the workforce, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5103

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment no. 2222 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the State plan requirements of section 1111 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 in order to support children facing substance abuse in the home, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5103

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Nelson, D-Fla., amendment no. 2215, as modified, to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to include partnering with current and recently retired STEM professionals and tailoring educational resources to engage students and teachers in STEM, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102-S5103

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment no. 2130 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend Title I to support assessments of school facilities, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Casey, D-Pa., amendment no. 2242 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to establish a Federal-State partnership to provide access to high-quality public prekindergarten programs from low-income and moderate-income families to ensure that they enter kindergarten prepared for success, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Sanders, I-Vt., amendment no. 2177 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to provide for youth jobs, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Wicker, R-Miss., amendment no. 2144 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to provide States and local educational agencies with resources on climate theory to promote improved science education, withdrawn by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102, S5115

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Brown, D-Ohio, amendment no. 2100 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend Title V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to establish a full-service community schools grant program, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Murphy, D-Conn., amendment no. 2186 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to establish the Promise Neighborhoods program, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5102

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Burr, R-N.C., amendment no. 2247, as modified, to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the allocation of funds under subpart 2 of part A of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5099-S5102

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Warren, D-Mass., amendment no. 2106 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to include specialized instructional support personnel in the literacy development of children, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5099

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Hatch, R-Utah, amendment no. 2082 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 relating to early learning, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098, S5099

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Cruz, R-Texas, amendment no. 2180 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to provide for State-determined assessment and accountability systems, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098-S5099

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Coons, D-Del., amendment no. 2243 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to authorize the establishment of American Dream Accounts, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5098

  • July 15, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., en bloc amendments to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, adopted by unanimous consent. (Alexander en bloc amendment nos. 2111, 2141, 2145, 2149, 2150, 2151 as modified, 2154, 2155, 2157, 2234, 2170, 2178, 2181, 2185, 2195, 2216, 2199, 2201, 2225, 2224 and 2227.) Congressional Record p. S5094-S5097

  • July 15, 2015 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S5092-S5125

  • July 15, 2015 — A. King, I-Maine, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2256 (2089). Congressional Record p. S5131

  • July 14, 2015Senate Vote 236 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — LGBT Anti-Discrimination
    Franken, D-Minn., amendment no. 2093 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would prohibit discrimination in schools based on a student's actual or perceived gender identity or sexual orientation. Any federal department that provides financial assistance to education programs via grants, loans or contracts would have to promulgate enforcement regulations, which would require presidential approval in order to become effective. Enforcement could include terminating funding. The amendment would create a private right of action for individuals who have faced discrimination. The attorney general also could bring civil actions for violations. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 52-45. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5046-S5047

  • July 14, 2015Senate Vote 235 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Assessment Opt-Out
    Lee, R-Utah, amendment no. 2162 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would require states, upon the request of a parent, to allow students to opt out from taking federally-mandated assessments. It also would exclude those students who opt-out from being counted toward the requirement that states measure annual progress of at least 95 percent of students. It also would add provisions dealing with state notification to parents about dates and subjects of scheduled assessments. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 32-64. Congressional Record p. S5038-S5039, S5045-S5046

  • July 14, 2015Senate Vote 234 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Information on Assessment Participation Policy
    Isakson, R-Ga., amendment no. 2194 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment, that would require local educational agencies that receive Title I funds to notify parents of students at the beginning of each school year that they can request information regarding state or local educational agency policy, procedure or parental right regarding student participation in any mandated assessments for that school year. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 97-0. Congressional Record p. S5039-S5045

  • July 14, 2015Senate Vote 233 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Homeless and Foster Children High School Graduation Rates
    Booker, D-N.J., amendment no. 2169 to the Alexander, R-Tenn, substitute amendment, that would require that the information on high school graduation rates that would be need to be included in state report cards detail the graduation rates of homeless children and children in foster care. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 56-40. Congressional Record p. S5033-S5035

  • July 14, 2015Senate Vote 232 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Title I Portability
    Scott, R-S.C., amendment no. 2132 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment, that would allow states to distribute Title I funds in a way that would follow low-income students to the schools they attend. The amendment also would include low-income students who attend private school, with the per-pupil funding for those students to be distributed by local educational agencies to their parents, to be used to pay tuition and fees at the student's private school. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 45-51. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S5034

  • July 14, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Portman, R-Ohio, amendment no. 2137 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to require state plans to describe how the state educational agency will demonstrate a coordinated plan to seamlessly transition students from secondary school to postsecondary education or careers without remediation, including a description of specific activities, such as providing students with access to early college high school or dual or concurrent enrollment opportunities, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5033-S5035

  • July 14, 2015 — Bennet, D-Colo., amendment no. 2210 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to require states to establish a limit on the aggregate amount of time spent on assessments, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5033-S5035, S5045

  • July 14, 2015 — Bennet, D-Colo., amendment no. 2159 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089,to authorize grants to establish Statewide Family Engagement Centers that provide training and technical assistance to state and local educational agencies, schools and certain organizations, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S5033-S5035

  • July 14, 2015 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S5023-S5035, S5035-S5057

  • July 14, 2015 — Boozman, R-Ark., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2231 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5065

  • July 14, 2015 — Markey, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2230 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5064-S5065

  • July 14, 2015 — Blumenthal, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2229 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5063, S5064

  • July 14, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2253 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5087

  • July 14, 2015 — A. King, I-Maine, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2254 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5087

  • July 14, 2015 — Coons, D-Del., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2243 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5078-S5080

  • July 14, 2015 — Merkley, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2255 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5087

  • July 14, 2015 — Cassidy, R-La., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2244 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5080

  • July 14, 2015 — C. Murphy, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2241 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5068-S5069

  • July 14, 2015 — Casey, D-Pa., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2242 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5069-S5078

  • July 14, 2015 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2232 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5065

  • July 14, 2015 — Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2245 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5080

  • July 14, 2015 — McCain, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2246 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5080

  • July 14, 2015 — Heitkamp, D-N.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2235 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5066

  • July 14, 2015 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2234 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5066

  • July 14, 2015 — Warren, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2236 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5066

  • July 14, 2015 — Warren, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2238 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5067

  • July 14, 2015 — Wyden, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2237 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5066-S5067

  • July 14, 2015 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2240 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5067-S5068

  • July 14, 2015 — Warren, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2239 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5067

  • July 14, 2015 — Baldwin, D-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2233 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5065-S5066

  • July 14, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2250 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5085-S5086

  • July 14, 2015 — Warren, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2249 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5085

  • July 14, 2015 — Burr, R-N.C., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2248 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5082-S5085

  • July 14, 2015 — Burr, R-N.C., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2247 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5080-S5082

  • July 14, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2251 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5086

  • July 14, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2252 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5064, S5086-S5087

  • July 13, 2015 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S5002

  • July 13, 2015 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089 to the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S5002

  • July 13, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Kaine, D-Va., amendment no. 2118 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to explicitly include specific measures of student readiness to enter postsecondary education or the workforce - such as enrollment rates in postsecondary education - as among the measures that may meet a requirement for an additional indicator of school quality and student success of the state's choosing to be annually reported under state accountability systems, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4997-S4998

  • July 13, 2015Senate Vote 231 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Student Privacy Policy Committee
    Hatch, R-Utah, amendment no. 2080 to the Alexander substitute amendment, that would establish a Student Privacy Policy Committee that would be tasked with conducting a study on the effectiveness of federal laws and enforcement mechanisms of student privacy and parental rights to student information. The panel also would be required to develop recommendations based on the findings addressing issues of student privacy and parental rights and how to improve federal laws regarding these issues. A report containing the study's findings and the recommendations would need to be submitted to Congress and the Education secretary. Panel members would be appointed by the Education secretary, the comptroller general, and House and Senate leaders. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 89-0. Congressional Record p. S4998

  • July 13, 2015 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4994-S5002

  • July 13, 2015 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2228 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5012, S5018

  • July 13, 2015 — Cornyn, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2227 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5012, S5016-S5018

  • July 13, 2015 — Tester, D-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2226 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5012, S5015-S5016

  • July 13, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2225 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5012, S5015

  • July 13, 2015 — Booker, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2224 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5012, S5015

  • July 13, 2015 — Donnelly, D-Ind., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2223 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011-S5012, S5015

  • July 13, 2015 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2222 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011, S5015

  • July 13, 2015 — Hirono, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2221 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011, S5015

  • July 13, 2015 — Hirono, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2220 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011, S5015

  • July 13, 2015 — Burr, R-N.C., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2219 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011, S5013-S5015

  • July 13, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2218 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011, S5013

  • July 13, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2217 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011, S5012-S5013

  • July 13, 2015 — Gillibrand, D-N.Y., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2216 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011, S5012

  • July 13, 2015 — H. Reid, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2215 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S5011, S5012

  • July 9, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Kaine, D-Va., amendment no. 2118 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the state accountability system under section 1113(b)(3) regarding the measures used to ensure that students are ready to enter post-secondary education or the workforce without the need for post-secondary remediation, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4925

  • July 9, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Franken, D-Minn., amendment no. 2093 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to prohibit discrimination in schools based on a student's actual or perceived gender identity or sexual orientation, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4925

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Hatch, R-Utah, amendment no. 2080 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to establish a Student Privacy Policy Committee that would be tasked with conducting a study on the effectiveness of federal laws and enforcement mechanisms of student privacy and parent rights to student information. The panel also would be tasked with developing recommendations based on the study, which would need to be submitted to Congress along with the study, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4923-S4925

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Scott, R-S.C., amendment no. 2132 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to allow states to distribute Title I funds in a way that would result in the funds following low-income students to the public schools they attend. The per-pupil funding for low-income children who attend private school would be given to their parents, to be used to pay tuition and fees at the child's private school, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4923-S4925

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Kirk, R-Ill., amendment no. 2161 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to ensure that states measure and report on indicators of student access to critical educational resources and identify disparities in such resources, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4923-S4925

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Klobuchar, D-Minn., amendment no. 2138 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 relating to improving student academic achievement in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, adopted by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4922-S4923

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Casey, D-Pa., amendment no. 2131 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to modify the bill relating to appropriate accommodations for children with disabilities, adopted by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4922-S4923

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Gardner, R-Colo., amendment no. 2119 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to include charter school representatives in the list of entities with whom a State and local educational agency shall consult in the development of plans under Title I, adopted by unanimous consent. (After adoption of the amendment, modifications to page and line were agreed to by unanimous consent.) Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4922-S4923, S4984

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Gillibrand, D-N.Y., amendment no. 2108 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the program under part E of Title II to ensure increased access to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics subject fields for underrepresented students, adopted by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4922-S4923

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for McCaskill, D-Mo., amendment no. 2092 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to enable states, as a consortium, to use certain grant funds to voluntarily develop a process that allows teachers who are licensed or certified in a participating state to teach in other participating states, adopted by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4922-S4923

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Gardner, R-Colo., amendment no. 2083 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to enable local educational agencies to use funds under part A of Title I for dual or concurrent enrollment programs at eligible schools, adopted by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4922-S4923

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Fischer, R-Neb., amendment no. 2079 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to state that the measure could not be construed to allow the Education Secretary to exercise any governance or authority over school administration, unless otherwise authorized under the measure, issue any regulation without first complying with certain rulemaking requirements under current law, or issue any non-regulatory guidance without first considering, to the extent feasible, stakeholder input, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4912, S4915

  • July 9, 2015Senate Vote 228 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — School Employees and Sexual Misconduct with Minors
    Toomey, R-Pa.,amendment no. 2094, as modified, to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, that would require states that receive federal education funds to have in place laws, regulations or policies that bar school employees or educational agencies from helping a school employee to obtain a new job if they know that the employee engaged in sexual misconduct regarding a minor. The measure would provide for certain exemptions, such as situations in which the information has been properly reported to authorities and the case has been officially closed or the prosecutor has notified school officials that there is insufficient information to establish probable cause. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 98-0. Congressional Record p. S4904, S4906-S4909, S4914

  • July 9, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Feinstein, D-Calif., amendment no. 2087 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to provide for additional means of certifying children, youth, parents, and families as homeless, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4912, S4915

  • July 9, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Kaine, D-Va., amendment no. 2096 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to add career and technical education as a core academic subject, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4912, S4915

  • July 9, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment no. 2103 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to enable local educational agencies to use funds under part A of Title IV of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 for programs and activities that promote volunteerism and community service, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4912, S4915

  • July 9, 2015Senate Vote 227 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Site Resource Coordinators
    Brown, D-Ohio, amendment no. 2099 to the Alexander substitute amendment, that would allow local educational agencies to use certain subgrants to designate a site resource coordinator at a school or local educational agency to provide a variety of services like establishing partnerships with communities to provide resources and support for schools. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 98-0. Congressional Record p. S4912, S4913-S4914

  • July 9, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Warren, D-Mass., amendment no. 2120 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend section 1111(d) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 regarding the cross-tabulation of student data, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4912, S4913

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Heller, R-Nev., amendment no. 2121 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to require a state educational agency to consult in a timely and meaningful manner with the governor in developing state plans, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4912, S4915

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Portman, R-Ohio, amendment no. 2147 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to promote recovery support services for students, adopted by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S4912, S4915

  • July 9, 2015Senate Vote 226 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Federal Programs Opt-Out
    Daines, R-Mont., amendment no. 2110 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment, that would allow states to opt-out of federal programs for up to five years. States would still receive federal funding, though it would be consolidated, like a block grant. Specifically, the amendment would allow states to submit a declaration of intent to the Education secretary that would permit the state to receive federal funds on a consolidated basis, which could be used for any educational purpose allowed under state law. The secretary would need to review the declaration of intent within 60 days and recognize it, unless it does not meet requirements laid out in the amendment for content to be included in the declaration of intent. States would need to establish an accountability system and issue annual student progress reports to parents and the general public. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 44-54. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S4909-S4912, S4913

  • July 9, 2015 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4904-S4915, S4920-S4926, S4926-S4929, S4931-S4934

  • July 9, 2015 — Vitter, R-La., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2213 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4964, S4979

  • July 9, 2015 — Booker, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2212 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4964, S4979

  • July 9, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2211 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963-S4964, S4978-S4979

  • July 9, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2210 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4978

  • July 9, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2209 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4978

  • July 9, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2208 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4978

  • July 9, 2015 — Mikulski, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2207 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4977-S4978

  • July 9, 2015 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2206 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4976-S4977

  • July 9, 2015 — Hirono, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2205. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4976

  • July 9, 2015 — Hirono, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2204. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4976

  • July 9, 2015 — Merkley, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2203 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4975-S4976

  • July 9, 2015 — Cruz, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2202 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4975

  • July 9, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2201 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4975

  • July 9, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2200 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4975

  • July 9, 2015 — L. Graham, R-S.C., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2199 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4975

  • July 9, 2015 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2198 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4974-S4975

  • July 9, 2015 — Gillibrand, D-N.Y., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2197 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4974

  • July 9, 2015 — Boxer, D-Calif., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2196. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4974

  • July 9, 2015 — Blunt, R-Mo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2195 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4974

  • July 9, 2015 — Isakson, R-Ga., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2194 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4973

  • July 9, 2015 — Boxer, D-Calif., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2193 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4973

  • July 9, 2015 — Boxer, D-Calif., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2192 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4973

  • July 9, 2015 — Booker, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2191 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4972

  • July 9, 2015 — Baldwin, D-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2190 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4971-S4972

  • July 9, 2015 — Baldwin, D-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2189 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4969-S4971

  • July 9, 2015 — Baldwin, D-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2188 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4968-S4969

  • July 9, 2015 — Franken, D-Minn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2187 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4968

  • July 9, 2015 — C. Murphy, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2186 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4967-S4968

  • July 9, 2015 — Whitehouse, D-R.I., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2185 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4965-S4967

  • July 9, 2015 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2184 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4965

  • July 9, 2015 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2183 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4965

  • July 9, 2015 — Ayotte, R-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2182 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4965

  • July 9, 2015 — McCain, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2181 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4965

  • July 9, 2015 — Cruz, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2180 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4964-S4965

  • July 9, 2015 — Crapo, R-Idaho, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2179 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4964

  • July 9, 2015 — Coons, D-Del., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2178 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4963, S4964

  • July 8, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Bennet, D-Colo., amendment no. 2115 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to provide for a study on increasing the effectiveness of existing services and programs intended to benefit children, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4827, S4831

  • July 8, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., amendment no. 2124, to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to require schools to collect and report data on interscholastic sports, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4827, S4831

  • July 8, 2015Senate Vote 224 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Native American Education Grant Programs
    Tester, D-Mont., amendment no. 2107 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would remove the measure's proposal to eliminate authorization of four Native American education grant programs related to teacher training, undergraduate and graduate fellowships, gifted students, and adult literacy. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 56-41. Congressional Record p. S4827, S4831

  • July 8, 2015Senate Vote 223 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders
    Hirono, D-Hawaii, amendment no. 2109 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would require states to enable academic assessment results under the measure to be disaggregated by the same race response categories as the decennial census of the population, which had categories for Asian American and Pacific Islander subgroups. The provision would be limited to school districts with at least 1,000 Asian and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander students. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 47-50. Congressional Record p. S4827, S4830

  • July 8, 2015Senate Vote 225 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — Federal Funds Following Students to Public or Private Schools
    Alexander, R-Tenn., amendment no. 2139 to the Alexander substitute amendment, that would provide for $24 billion in federal funds to be effectively redirected for grants that states could issue for students from families with incomes below the poverty level that parents could use to supplement the budget of a public school the student attends, pay for fees required to attend another public school or to pay for tuition to attend a private school. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Rejected 45-52. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for adoption of the amendment, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S4827, S4831

  • July 8, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Rounds, R-S.D., amendment no. 2078, to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to require the secretary of Education and the secretary of the Interior to conduct a study regarding elementary and secondary education in rural or poverty areas of Indian country, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4816

  • July 8, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Warner, D-Va., amendment no. 2086, to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to enable the use of certain state and local administrative funds for fiscal support teams, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4816

  • July 8, 2015Senate Vote 222 No Child Left Behind Overhaul — School Libraries
    Reed, D-R.I., amendment no. 2085 to the Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment that would give states and school districts the option to include in their Title I plans information on how they will help in developing effective school library programs to provide students an opportunity to develop digital literacy skills and help ensure that all students graduate from high school prepared for post-secondary education or the workforce without remediation needed. The Alexander substitute would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school. It would let states decide how to judge schools' success and wouldn't require any type of teacher evaluation. It would require states to continue testing students annually, but would leave it up to states to decide what weight those scores have when rating schools. Adopted 98-0. Congressional Record p. S4816

  • July 8, 2015 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4806-S4831

  • July 8, 2015 — Sanders, I-Vt., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2177 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4887-S4890

  • July 8, 2015 — Markey, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2176 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4886-S4887

  • July 8, 2015 — Markey, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2175 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4886

  • July 8, 2015 — Heitkamp, D-N.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2174 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4886

  • July 8, 2015 — Booker, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2173 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4886

  • July 8, 2015 — Merkley, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2172 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4885-S4886

  • July 8, 2015 — Heitkamp, D-N.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2171 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4884-S4885

  • July 8, 2015 — Booker, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2170 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4884

  • July 8, 2015 — Booker, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2169 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4884

  • July 8, 2015 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2168 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4882-S4884

  • July 8, 2015 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2167 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4881-S4882

  • July 8, 2015 — S. Brown, D-Ohio, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2166 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4880-S4881

  • July 8, 2015 — Isakson, R-Ga., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2165 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4880

  • July 8, 2015 — Isakson, R-Ga., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2164 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4880

  • July 8, 2015 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2163 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4880

  • July 8, 2015 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2162 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4879-S4880

  • July 8, 2015 — Kirk, R-Ill., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2161 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4879

  • July 8, 2015 — Menendez, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2160 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4876-S4879

  • July 8, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2159 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4875-S4876

  • July 8, 2015 — Flake, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2158 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4875

  • July 8, 2015 — Flake, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2157 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4875

  • July 8, 2015 — Capito, R-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2156 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4874-S4875

  • July 8, 2015 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2155 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4874

  • July 8, 2015 — H. Reid, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2154 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4874

  • July 8, 2015 — H. Reid, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2153 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4872-S4874

  • July 8, 2015 — Casey, D-Pa., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2152 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4864-S4872

  • July 8, 2015 — Carper, D-Del., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2151 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4864

  • July 8, 2015 — Feinstein, D-Calif., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2150 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4864

  • July 8, 2015 — Udall, D-N.M., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2149 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4864

  • July 8, 2015 — McCain, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2148 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4864

  • July 8, 2015 — Portman, R-Ohio, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2147 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4864

  • July 8, 2015 — Cotton, R-Ark., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2146 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4864

  • July 8, 2015 — Ayotte, R-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2145 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4864

  • July 8, 2015 — Wicker, R-Miss., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2144 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4863-S4864

  • July 8, 2015 — Durbin, D-Ill., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2143 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4862-S4863

  • July 8, 2015 — Blumenthal, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2142 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4862

  • July 8, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2141 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4862

  • July 8, 2015 — Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2140. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4862

  • July 8, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2139 (2089). Congressional Record p. S4845, S4859-S4862

  • July 8, 2015 — Klobuchar, D-Minn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2138 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4859

  • July 8, 2015 — Portman, R-Ohio, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2137 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4845, S4859

  • July 8, 2015 — C. Murphy, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2136 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844-S4845, S4856-S4859

  • July 8, 2015 — Gillibrand, D-N.Y., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2135 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4856

  • July 8, 2015 — T. Scott, R-S.C., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2134. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4854-S4856

  • July 8, 2015 — T. Scott, R-S.C., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2133 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4854

  • July 8, 2015 — T. Scott, R-S.C., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2132 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4853-S4854

  • July 8, 2015 — Casey, D-Pa., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2131 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4853

  • July 8, 2015 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2130 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4852

  • July 8, 2015 — Tester, D-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2129 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4852

  • July 8, 2015 — Kaine, D-Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2128 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4851-S4852

  • July 8, 2015 — Coons, D-Del., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2127 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4849-S4851

  • July 8, 2015 — Coons, D-Del., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2126 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4847-S4849

  • July 8, 2015 — Sanders, I-Vt., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2125 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4847

  • July 8, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2124 (2089). Congressional Record p. S4844, S4847

  • July 8, 2015 — Udall, D-N.M., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2123 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4846-S4847

  • July 8, 2015 — Stabenow, D-Mich., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2122 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4844, S4845-S4846

  • July 7, 2015 — Toomey, R-Pa., amendment no. 2094 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to protect our children from convicted pedophiles, child molesters, and other sex offenders infiltrating our schools and from schools "passing the trash"---helping pedophiles obtain jobs at other schools, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4676-S4677

  • July 7, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Warner, D-Va., amendment no. 2086, to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to enable the use of certain state and local administrative funds for fiscal support teams, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4675

  • July 7, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Reed, D-R.I. amendment no. 2085 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 regarding school librarians and effective school library programs, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4675

  • July 7, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Rounds, R-S.D. amendment no. 2078, to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, o require the secretary of Education and the secretary of the Interior to conduct a study regarding elementary and secondary education in rural or poverty areas of Indian country, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4675

  • July 7, 2015 — Murray, D-Wash., for Peters, D-Mich., amendment no. 2095 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to allow local educational agencies to use parent and family engagement funds for financial literacy activities, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4675

  • July 7, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., for Fischer, R-Neb. amendment no. 2079 to Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, to ensure local governance of education, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4674-S4675

  • July 7, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., substitute amendment no. 2089, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4669-S4674

  • July 7, 2015 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4661-S4678

  • July 7, 2015Statement of Administration Policy issued by Office of Management and Budget.

  • July 7, 2015 — Heller, R-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2121 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4801

  • July 7, 2015 — Warren, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2120 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4801

  • July 7, 2015 — Gardner, R-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2119 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4801

  • July 7, 2015 — Kaine, D-Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2118 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4800-S4801

  • July 7, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2117 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4800

  • July 7, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2116 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4800

  • July 7, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2115 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4800

  • July 7, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2114 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4799-S4800

  • July 7, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2113 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4799

  • July 7, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2112 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4798-S4799

  • July 7, 2015 — McCain, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2111 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4798

  • July 7, 2015 — Daines, R-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2110 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4797

  • July 7, 2015 — Hirono, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2109 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4796

  • July 7, 2015 — Gillibrand, D-N.Y., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2108 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4796

  • July 7, 2015 — Tester, D-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2107 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4796

  • July 7, 2015 — Warren, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2106 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4796

  • July 7, 2015 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2105 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4795-S4796

  • July 7, 2015 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2104 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4795

  • July 7, 2015 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2103 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4795

  • July 7, 2015 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2102 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4795

  • July 7, 2015 — Enzi, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2101 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4794-S4795

  • July 7, 2015 — S. Brown, D-Ohio, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2100 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4792-S4794

  • July 7, 2015 — S. Brown, D-Ohio, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2099 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4792

  • July 7, 2015 — S. Brown, D-Ohio, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2098 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4790-S4792

  • July 7, 2015 — S. Brown, D-Ohio, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2097 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4783-S4789

  • July 7, 2015 — Kaine, D-Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2096 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4782

  • July 7, 2015 — G. Peters, D-Mich., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2095 (2089). Congressional Record p. S4690, S4782

  • July 7, 2015 — Toomey, R-Pa., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2094 (2089). Congressional Record p. S4690, S4782

  • July 7, 2015 — Franken, D-Minn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2093 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4780-S4782

  • July 7, 2015 — McCaskill, D-Mo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2092 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4780

  • July 7, 2015 — McCaskill, D-Mo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2091 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4690, S4780

  • July 7, 2015 — Whitehouse, D-R.I., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2090 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4689-S4690, S4777-S4780

  • July 7, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2089. Congressional Record p. S4689, S4694-S4777

  • July 7, 2015 — J. Reed, D-R.I., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2088 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4689, S4694

  • July 7, 2015 — Feinstein, D-Calif., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2087 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4689, S4694

  • July 7, 2015 — M. Warner, D-Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2086 (2089). Congressional Record p. S4689, S4694

  • July 7, 2015 — J. Reed, D-R.I., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2085 (2089). Congressional Record p. S4689, S4693-S4694

  • July 7, 2015 — Alexander, R-Tenn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2084 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4689, S4692-S4693

  • July 7, 2015 — Gardner, R-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2083 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4689, S4692

  • July 7, 2015 — Hatch, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2082 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4689, S4692

  • July 7, 2015 — Hatch, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2081 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4689, S4691-S4692

  • July 7, 2015 — Hatch, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2080 (2089). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S4689, S4691

  • July 7, 2015 — Fischer, R-Neb., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2079 (2089). Congressional Record p. S4689, S4691

  • July 7, 2015 — Rounds, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 2078 (2089). Congressional Record p. S4689, S4690

  • May 8, 2015Cost Estimate issued by Congressional Budget Office.

  • April 30, 2015 — Reported to the Senate by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar. Congressional Record p. S2566

  • April 30, 2015 — Introduced as an original bill and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar. Congressional Record p. S2568

  • April 16, 2015 — Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee vote: Elementary and Secondary Education-Vote to Report
    Ordered reported favorably to the full Senate (as amended) 22-0.

  • April 16, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

    April 16, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Title II Formula Allocation
      Burr, R-N.C. —

    Amendment that would allocate Title II money for teacher training and professional development based 80 percent on poverty and 20 percent on population, rather than 65 percent on poverty and 35 percent on population as in the base bill.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    April 16, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Hold Harmless Impact Reduction
      Casey, D-Pa. —

    Amendment that would require the Education Department to gradually reduce the amount states receive in Title II teacher training and development funds through fiscal 2020.

    Beginning in fiscal 2021, a state could receive no less than 25 percent of the funds it received in 2001. If Congress appropriates more funding one year than in the year prior, the Education Department would have to prioritize funding to those states whose allocation is growing.

    Adopted 13-9.

    April 16, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Title II Reductions
      Burr, R-N.C. —

    Amendment that would reduce each state’s Title II teacher training and development allowance by no more than 14.29 percent each year through fiscal 2021.

    Adopted 12-10.

    April 16, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Specialized Charter Schools
      Cassidy, R-La. —

    Amendment that would allow charter schools that use an evidence-based curriculum to educate children with a specific learning disability to use a weighted lottery for entry.

    Rejected 5-17.

    April 16, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Juvenile Justice Programs
      C. Murphy, D-Conn. —

    Amendment that would allow funds under the bill to be used to train prosecutors, judges, probation officers and other court personnel in the needs and challenges of youths in the juvenile justice system.

    Rejected 10-12.

    April 16, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — LGBT Anti-Discrimination
      Franken, D-Minn. —

    Amendment that would prohibit discrimination in schools based on a student’s actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.

    It also would prohibit retaliation against whistle-blowers or others who report unlawful conduct under the section. Any department of the federal government that makes grants, loans or contracts to schools would have to promulgate enforcement regulations, and any school that fails to comply could lose federal funding.

    The amendment would create a private right of action for individuals who have faced discrimination. The attorney general also could bring actions against schools that don’t comply.

    Withdrawn.

    April 16, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Vote to Report

    Reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the law that authorizes federal spending on kindergarten through high school.

    The bill would require states to set school accountability standards. Those standards would have to include student test scores, high school graduation rates and a measure of English language proficiency for English language learners. States could decide what weight to give each of those metrics.

    Schools would have to disaggregate testing data and report on student performance by race, disability status, income and English proficiency status. As amended, states could use money given under the bill to audit the number of tests given by states and districts and eliminate redundant, low-quality tests.

    States would have to set challenging academic standards for schools. The federal government would be prohibited from mandating or incentivizing any particular curriculum, including the Common Core.

    The measure would maintain the existing annual testing requirement: once annually in reading and math in grades three through eight and once in high school, and once each in elementary, middle and high school in science.

    It would provide grants to states and schools to improve low-performing schools. Districts would design "evidence-based" interventions in poorly performing schools. The federal government could not mandate any specific steps for improving low-performing schools. States would have to monitor turnaround efforts and take certain steps if an intervention is ineffective.

    As amended, the bill would divide Title II funds for teacher training to states based 80 percent on poverty and 20 percent on population. The bill would eliminate a "hold harmless" provision in existing law that prohibits any state that would lose money under a reallocation of funds from receiving significantly less funding than the previous year. Also as amended, the bill would dictate that any state that receives less funding than the previous year lose no more than 14.29 percent annually through fiscal 2021, after which the hold harmless provision would be eliminated.

    It would allow, but not require, states to develop and implement teacher evaluation systems.

    The bill would provide funds to states and school districts for high-quality language instruction for English language learners, including immigrant children. It would require states to measure districts' progress in instructing English language learners and provide assistance to those schools where programs are not effective.

    It would update the federal charter school program by melding two programs into one that offers three grant competitions: grants to states to start new charter schools and replicate or expand existing schools; grants to finance the acquisition, construction or renovation of school facilities; and grants to charter management organizations to replicate high-quality charter schools.

    The bill would prohibit the federal government from imposing conditions on any waivers given under the measure.

    The measure would specify that states may use funds given under Title I (low-income students), Title II (teacher training and development) and Title III (English language learners) for preschool programs.

    Ordered reported favorably to the full Senate (as amended) 22-0.
  • April 15, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Teacher and Principal Qualifications
      Casey, D-Pa. —

    Amendment that would define "profession-ready" qualifications for teachers and principals and require those professionals are equally distributed to low-income schools.

    Withdrawn.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Seclusion and Restraint
      C. Murphy, D-Conn. —

    Amendment that would require states to detail how they protect students from the use of seclusion and restraints imposed solely for discipline or convenience.

    Adopted 12-10.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Gifted Education
      Mikulski, D-Md. —

    Amendment that would include the Jacob J. Javits program, which provides grants to states, school districts and colleges to help train teachers in the identification and instruction of gifted and talented children.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Children's Educational Programming
      Casey, D-Pa. —

    Amendment that would authorize the Ready to Learn program to provide grants for educational and instructional video programming for preschool- and elementary-school-aged children.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — STEM Education
      Franken, D-Minn. —

    Amendment that would provide grants to states and high-need schools to increase access to science, technology, engineering and math courses.

    Grant recipients could use the funds to recruit teachers, train or mentor new teachers in the subjects or provide professional development. They also could use the funds to pay for entry fees for STEM competitions.

    Adopted 12-10.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Teacher Leadership
      M. Bennet, D-Colo. —

    Amendment that would allow states and districts to use teacher preparation and professional development to create teacher leadership programs.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Workforce Needs
      Baldwin, D-Wis. —

    Amendment that would require states to identify "workforce critical" subjects, including the STEM fields, and how they will recruit and train teachers in those subjects.

    Rejected 10-12.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Accelerated Learning
      Franken, D-Minn. —

    Amendment that would authorize grants to states to reimburse low-income students for the costs of tests in accelerated learning programs like Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate. It also would provide grants to train educators to teach those courses.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Dyslexia Teacher Training
      Cassidy, R-La. —

    Amendment that would permit states to use teacher training funds to train teachers and principals on identifying and understanding the early indicators of dyslexia and "other specific learning disabilities."

    Rejected 10-12.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Family Engagement
      M. Bennet, D-Colo. —

    Amendment that would authorize grants to states and school districts for family engagement programs.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — En Bloc Amendments
    Alexander, R-Tenn. —

    Adopt, en bloc, the following amendments:

    • Murkowski, R-Alaska, that would authorize 21st Century Community Learning Centers to provide academic enrichment before and after school or during school breaks.
    • *Murray, D-Wash., that would allow funds to be used for Project SERV grants that are given to schools that experience acts of violence or trauma.

      *Baldwin, D-Wis., that would provide grants to states and schools to create, improve or expand physical education programs.

      *Bennet, D-Colo., that would allow grants under the bill to be used for financial literacy and federal financial aid awareness programs.

      *Bennet that would provide grants for education research and innovation. At least 25 percent of funds each year would have to go to projects in rural areas. Grant recipients would have to obtain at least 10 percent matching funds.

      *Whitehouse, D-R.I., that would allow the Education Department to award competitive grants for arts education and literacy skills in low-income communities.

      *Franken, D-Minn., that would create a grant program to support schools and programs that provide instruction in Native American and Alaska Native languages.

      *Bennet that would require the Education Department to do outreach to rural schools about opportunities to apply for competitive grants under the act. The department also would have to provide rural schools technical assistance in applying for grants should they request help.

      *Casey, D-Pa., that would require states to design and implement a process to give Title IV grants to schools that want to reduce exclusionary discipline practices.

      Adopted (en bloc) by voice vote.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — School Counseling
        Franken, D-Minn. —

      Amendment that would authorize grants to school districts to establish and expand school counseling programs. The Education Department would have to prioritize programs serving students with the greatest need, as measured by poverty, school achievement and other metrics.

      Adopted 14-8.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Weighted Student Funding Pilot
        M. Bennet, D-Colo. —

      Amendment that would authorize a pilot project in up to 25 school districts that would allow them to consolidate federal, state and local funding to weigh per-pupil funding based on student poverty.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Well-Rounded Education
        Casey, D-Pa. —

      Amendment that would give grants to districts, nonprofits, museums and other groups to provide access to classes in non-core subjects to low-income students. Covered subjects include civics, foreign languages, economics, health and computer science.

      Rejected 10-11.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Anti-Bullying Plan
        Alexander, R-Tenn. —

      Amendment that would require states and schools to create anti-bullying policies. The amendment would suggest but not require that the policies protect students based on race, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and disability status, and that they include grievance procedures and reporting requirements. It would clarify that it does not invalidate rights under other state or federal laws, including the Civil Rights Act, and that it does not impose on existing legal standards under the First Amendment.

      Withdrawn.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Anti-Bullying Plan
        Casey, D-Pa. —

      Amendment that would require states and schools to create anti-bullying policies. It would require that schools prohibit bullying based on a student’s actual or perceived race, color, national origin, sex, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or religion. School districts would have to collect information and report annually on incidences of bullying.

      Withdrawn.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Literacy Programs and Dyslexia
        Cassidy, R-La. —

      Amendment that would clarify that literacy programs receiving grants under the bill must serve children with dyslexia and "other specific learning disabilities."

      Rejected 8-14.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Early Learning Program Consolidation
        Murray, D-Wash. —

      Amendment that would authorize grants to states to more efficiently use varying federal and state funding for high-quality early childhood education programs.

      States would have to match at least 30 percent of the federal funding. The amendment would prohibit the Education Department from defining measures of quality, teacher pay, student-teacher ratio or other criteria for the supported preschool programs.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Technology in Classrooms
        Baldwin, D-Wis. —

      Amendment that would authorize grants to state to use technology in the classroom to close achievement gaps and improve student performance.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — College Information Pilot Program
        Warren, D-Mass. —

      Amendment that would require the Education Department to create a demonstration program to investigate the effectiveness of providing semi-customized information about higher education to students at high-need high schools.

      Withdrawn.

      April 15, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — State and Federal Regulations
        Whitehouse, D-R.I. —

      Amendment that would provide grants for innovation in schools and allow the Education Department to waive federal requirements to allow for innovation.

      Withdrawn.

  • April 14, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

    April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Manager's Amendment
      Alexander, R-Tenn. —

    Amendment that would make technical changes and would:

    • Authorize grants for the development of state assessments.
    • Authorize grants specifically for the education of Native Hawaiian and Alaska Native children.
    • Make measurements of workforce readiness an optional, rather than required, component of state accountability systems.
    • Adopted without objection.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Testing Audits
        Baldwin, D-Wis. —

      Amendment that would that would authorize grants to states to audit the tests given and eliminate redundant and low-quality exams.

      Adopted 22-0.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Competency-Based Education Exams
        S. Collins, R-Maine —

      Amendment that would require the Education Department to approve the use of competency-based exams in five states over three years. It would allow states to use the exams in some districts for three years before expanding to the rest of the state for another two years.

      Adopted 22-0.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Computer-Adaptive Tests
        Franken, D-Minn. —

      Amendment that would allow states to use computer-adaptive assessments for students with disabilities.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Testing Opt-Out Rights
        Isakson, R-Ga. —

      Amendment that would clarify that nothing in the bill supersedes state or local regulations that allow parents to opt their children out of standardized tests.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Career and Technical Education
        Baldwin, D-Wis. —

      Amendment that would require states to report on the performance of students in career and technical education programs.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Data Reporting
        M. Bennet, D-Colo. —

      Amendment that would require states to assess and evaluate their systems from collecting data from school districts and the need to upgrade those systems.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Title I Portability
        T. Scott, R-S.C. —

      Amendment that would allow states to distribute Title I funds for the education of low-income children to the specific school they attend.

      The per-pupil funding for eligible children who attend private school would be given to their parents and could not exceed the cost of tuition and fees at the child’s private school.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Teacher Evaluation
        Warren, D-Mass. —

      Amendment that would require states that use a teacher or principal evaluation system to explain why criteria used to judge educators are "reasonable and reliable measures of effectiveness."

      Rejected 10-12.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Middle School
        Whitehouse, D-R.I. —

      Amendment that would provide grants to states to focus on improving middle schools.

      States would have to create a plan on how to improve middle schools and award competitive grants to school districts. Schools would have to use the funds for enumerated purposes, including creating an early warning system to identify students who may struggle and aligning curriculum from kindergarten through 12th grade to ease transitions between elementary, middle and high school.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Resource Equity
        Baldwin, D-Wis. —

      Amendment that would require states to identify and address disparities in resources between low-income and high-income schools and between schools with high minority populations and low minority populations. Resources measured would have to include access to the best teachers, effective family and community engagement, the availability of preschool programs, equitable class size and other measures. States would have to develop a timeline for improvement of disparities.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Funding Comparability
        M. Bennet, D-Colo. —

      Amendment that would require school districts to show that per-pupil spending at low-income schools served under Title I is the same as per-pupil spending at higher income schools. The calculation would have to include personnel expenditures.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Lowest-Performing School Accountability
        M. Bennet, D-Colo. —

      Amendment that would require states to identify the 5 percent of schools that are lowest performing.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Schoolwide Programs
        Warren, D-Mass. —

      Amendment that would require states to approve a school’s use of Title I funds for schoolwide programs when less than 40 percent of the school’s students live in poverty.

      Rejected 10-12.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Military-Connected Children
      Murray, D-Wash. —

      Amendment that would require schools to report on the performance of children whose parents are in the military, including in the National Guard. The students' achievement would not be used to make state or local accountability decisions.

      Adopted 15-7.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Cross-Tabulated Data
        Warren, D-Mass. —

      Amendment that would require states to cross-tabulate data when reporting on student achievement.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Alternative Assessment Cap
        Isakson, R-Ga. —

      Amendment that would strike the 1 percent cap on the number of children with disabilities in each state who may take an alternative test.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Intervention in Failing Schools
        C. Murphy, D-Conn. —

      Amendment that would require states to identify schools that are low performers for two years in a row and to assist school districts if district turnaround fail to improve low-performing schools for three years.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Foster Children
        Franken, D-Minn. —

      Amendment that would require state education departments to detail how they will cooperate with state child welfare agencies to ensure the educational stability of children in foster care. The reports would have to include assurances that children could stay in their original school even if they are placed with a foster family outside the district, unless doing so is not in the child’s best interest, and details about how school districts and child welfare agencies will share costs of transporting a foster child his or her original school.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — High School Redesign
        Baldwin, D-Wis. —

      Amendment that would create a competitive grant program for high school redesign. The grants would be focused on traditionally underserved students at low-income or high minority schools and could be used for a variety of programs, including creating an early warning to identify students likely to struggle, improving middle school to high school transition, offering professional development for teachers and providing career and college counseling.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Preschool Teacher Compensation
        C. Murphy, D-Conn. —

      Amendment that would allow states to use funds provided under the bill to increase pay for preschool teachers so it is comparable to K-12 teachers.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Growth Metrics
        M. Bennet, D-Colo. —

      Amendment that would require states to judge school accountability based on student growth.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — High School Graduation Rate
        Warren, D-Mass. —

      Amendment that would require states to identify high schools with graduation rates under 67 percent for two or more years as in need of improvement.

      Withdrawn.

      April 14, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education — Multiyear Improvement Goals
        Warren, D-Mass. —

      Amendment that would require states to establish "ambitious but achievable goals" for different subgroups of students. States also would have to create multiyear goals, including goals for workforce preparation and a high school graduation rate of at least 90 percent.

      Withdrawn.

Legislative Action Center